Inspiring learning

At Kingswood College, we create an environment that aims to foster the building of a strong foundation for lifelong learning through the promotion of a positive learning environment – one that stimulates the creation of enthusiasm for learning.

Accounting

HOD: T. Timm

The study of Accounting is much more than the recording of financial data. The subject focuses on measuring performance and includes analysis, interpretation, evaluation and communication of financial statements and managerial reports for use by interested parties.
The subject also includes the study of business ethics, transparency and accountability as well as auditing, managerial and cost accounting.

Our approach is to link education more closely to the real world. Pupils are expected to learn the skills needed to solve problems, think critically, analyse, access and practically apply financial and managerial knowledge. To do this a case study approach is used. Pupils learn how to identify problem areas within a business and make suggestions on how to rectify the problem.

Why should you study Accounting?

A life skill – regardless of career, everyone needs an understanding of finance. A broad subject with multiple applications.

Afrikaans

HOD: T. Ackerman

In a multi-cultural society being able to communicate in an additional language is essential and of great benefit. It especially serves pupils planning to enter a career in education, public service, human resources, business and medicine.

As the late Nelson Mandela said: “If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart.”

We place emphasis  on expanding vocabulary through meaningful pupil-centred activities that involve contemporary teaching methodologies. Pupils will enjoy literary, musical, theatrical and cultural activities.

Arts & Culture

HOD: J. Wright

The Creative Arts programme is offered to Grade 8 and Grade 9 pupils. The aim of this programme is to provide exposure to all the Arts on offer at Kingswood College, before pupils select core subjects in Grade 10. In Grade 8 our pupils rotate through modules of Art, Drama, Music and Technology. The Technology module is an introduction to coding and creating a foundation in coding. In Art, pupils lay a foundation of different techniques which they then build on in Grade 9. The Drama module focus on the basics of performing, characterization and improvisation as well as stage craft. Students can opt to take subject Music from Grade 8, which looks at both practical and theoretical development. In Grade 9, pupils choose two Arts subjects which they then continue with throughout their Grade 9 year. This allows them to specialize in two of the Arts and keeps their Arts options open for choosing subjects for the Senior phase of high school.

Business Studies

N. Hartzenberg

Business Studies is a broad academic subject in the Social Sciences, taught in Schools from Grade 10 to 12. It allows for the in-depth study of a range of specialty topics such as General Management, Financial Management, Human Resources Management, Marketing, Public Relations, Entrepreneurship, Forms of Ownership, Investment, Insurance, Risk Management, Creative Thinking and Problem Solving, Ethics, Professionalism, Social Responsibility, Corporate Governance, Team and Conflict Management, Business Environmental analysis, Organisational Performance, Research and presentation of data and information.

Application of Business Knowledge, Problem-Solving and Analysis are two areas focused on specifically in the final Grade 12 assessments.

Computer Application Technologies

HOD: D. Tipler

Computer Applications Technology broadly involves understanding the concepts of ICTs with regard to the components that make up a computing system, as well as the proficient use of end-user software applications in problem-solving. A successful end-user will, amongst otherthings, be able to use the Internet and World Wide Web to find relevant data. They will then be able to process this data into information, make decisions and communicate their findings in an appropriate manner using appropriate applications. All of which will be done against the backdrop of the responsible use of ICTs from a legal, ethical, environmental and social point of view. (ICTs = Information and Communication Technologies)

Computer Literacy

D. Tipler

Computer Literacy is a foundation course which seeks to ensure that all Grade 8s are on the same digital page by the end of their first year in the senior school. The content includes becoming familiar with the use of Gmail, Google as a research tool and Classroom for the management of work and the submission thereof. We then move on to some of the Microsoft Office applications. Word processing and spreadsheet skills are developed in order to facilitate the effective use of these programs in support of their other subjects.

Drama

HOD: J. Wright

Drama is about action and communication. It is a means of artistic expression. As a subject, Drama not only equips pupils with the necessary skills to pursue a career in performance, but teaches valuable life lessons such as the importance of teamwork and being a reliable member of a group. It is a subject that builds confidence and encourages creative thinking. Drama explores both the practical and theoretical side of performance and theatrical movements. Drama allows for creative play and most importantly independent thinking. Come play!

Economics

HOD: T. van Molendorff

Economics is the study of how individuals, businesses, governments and other organisations within our society choose to use scarce resources to satisfy their numerous needs and wants in a manner that is efficient and equitable. This subject equips learners with knowledge and skills that will enable them to participate in a complex economic society.

“…….the master-economist must possess a rare combination of gifts. He must be mathematician, historian, statesman, philosopher–in some degree. He must understand symbols and speak in words. He must contemplate the particular in terms of the general, and touch abstract and concrete in the same flight of thought. He must study the present in the light of the past for the purposes of the future. No part of man’s nature or his institutions must lie entirely outside his regard. He must be purposeful and disinterested in a simultaneous mood; as aloof and incorruptible as an artist, yet sometimes as near the earth as a politician.” John Maynard Keynes

Engineering Graphics & Design (EGD)

A. Guest

Engineering Graphics and Design is the integration of cognitive and manipulative skills used to design and communicate graphically. It is a combination of lines, symbols and signs used to render services and design processes and systems that contribute towards economic growth and enhanced quality of life.

  • Engineering Graphics and Design will contribute towards learners’ technological literacy by giving them opportunities for:
  • Applying the Design Process to solve Civil, Electrical and Mechanical problems
  • Understanding and using concepts and knowledge; and
    Developing and applying specific skills.

The context of this subject is Civil, Electrical & Mechanical. The implications of this is that the graphics and designs produced and engaged in will have to be reflective of Civil, Electrical & Mechanical. The graphic drawings are done freehand, with instruments and using a CAD program.

English

HOD: T. Carlson

Learning a language is to understand others and make connections.

The seventeen syllables of this Haiku epitomise not just the hidden agenda of the English Department but also our secret mission and collective modus operandi. As teachers of the only non-choice subject, we are placed in the unique situation of having to, on occasion, justify our position in our pupils’ curriculum. We can cite Wittgenstein and suggest that “the limits of one’s language are in fact the limits of our world”. Hence, it is not always about the Literature we’re studying or how effectively our pupils can deconstruct semantic or grammatical structures; more probably it is about the collaboration and improvisation that goes into their process and ours. Learning these two qualities (if we are to believe the premise set up by Charles Darwin) are what will ensure that these pupils will prevail through “the infinite use of the finite means” that is language.

French

HOD: S. Ndlovu

French is said to be the language of love, and discovery. Studies have shown that learning a second language makes speakers more linguistically aware of the grammar rules of languages, including their own.
A French lesson is a cultural journey into the worlds of fashion, gastronomy, the arts, architecture and science. Learning French also offers access to the works of great French writers such as Victor Hugo or Marcel Proust and famous poets like Charles Baudelaire in the original text. It means being able to hear the voices of actors and being able to understand the words of French songs. Our subject, therefore, prepares and equips the students to take on the world linguistically, academically and socially.
The aim is to evoke “un Coup de foudre” when students write, read and speak the French language.

Geography

HOD: D. Pyle

“Geography prepares for the world of work – geographers, with their skills of analysis are highly employable. Geography is a living, breathing subject, constantly adapting itself to change. It is dynamic and relevant. For me geography is a great adventure with a purpose.” Michael Palin, 2018.

History

HOD: W. Koopman

The study of History meets a variety of needs, including the need to understand the world in which we live and the process of change and continuity in human affairs.  History involves a dialogue between the past and the present. It develops the ability to think critically, and assess, evaluate, analyse and solve problem-centred issues.

Where History differs from other disciplines is in the context and range of its material, for it involves the comprehension and analysis of evidence about all people and their activities throughout the ages.  The evidence which is studied is inevitably varied and may be conflicting in itself.  Consequently the pupil learns how to question and assess what is reported of any human event and thus to distinguish between evidence and interpretation.

Information Technology (IT)

HOD: M. Tweddle

Information Technology (IT) is the study of how computers work, how they communicate and how to use them to solve problems. A candidate will learn to utilise the information they learn about computers to solve problems, using logical and computational thinking, and developing fully featured programs using the Java language.

IsiXhosa

HOD: S. Beyi

IsiXhosa language gives pupils an opportunity to be bilingual / multilingual. Frank Smith sums it up by saying, “One language sets you in a corridor for life.Two languages open every door along the way.”

Learning another language is not only learning different words for the same things, but learning another way to think about things.
It also promotes intercultural relations. In IsiXhosa Department we cannot stress enough the importance of the culture of reading IsiXhosa literature as it promotes knowledge and improves vocabulary that will boost pupils’ confidence.

Communication breaks down barriers and builds respect for each other.
Being able to communicate in an additional language opens doors and thus invests in your future.

Life Orientation

HOD: J. Stewart

R. Ambedkar says “Unlike a drop of water which loses its identity when it joins the ocean, man does not lose his being in the society in which he lives. Man’s life is independent. He is born not for the development of the society alone, but for the development of his self.”

Life Orientation is about Educating for Life. We want learners to have the social, personal, intellectual, emotional and physical skills needed to reach their full potential for living a meaningful life. We look at helping individuals develop their identity in a rapidly changing society so that they can deal with whatever eventuality they experience.

Life Sciences

HOD: C. de Coning

Life Sciences is a dynamic subject that incorporates a diverse range of subject matter.

The study of the diversity of living organisms, their interrelationships and interdependence, provides pupils with an understanding of the living world and how it functions. Human biology and relevant health issues are also given focus.

It allows for the development of a wide range of skills, including critical thinking and practical skills in a manner that is applicable to all aspects of life.

It equips pupils to make socially responsible and informed decisions on health and environmental issues. These are invaluable skills regardless of what field they find themselves pursuing.

Mathematics

HOD: L. Potgieter

Mathematics is a language that makes use of symbols and notations for describing numerical, geometric and graphical relationships.

It is an activity that involves observing, representing and investigating patterns and qualitative relationships in physical and social phenomena and between mathematical objects themselves. It helps to develop mental processes that enhance logical and critical thinking, accuracy and problem solving that will contribute in decision-making. Mathematical problem solving enables us to understand the world (physical, social and economic) around us, and, most of all, to teach us to think creatively.

Mathematical Literacy

HOD: L. McLean

Mathematical Literacy provides pupils with an awareness and understanding of the role that mathematics plays in the modern world. Mathematical Literacy is a subject driven by life-related applications of mathematics. It enables pupils to develop the ability and confidence to think numerically and spatially in order to interpret and critically analyse everyday situations and to solve problems. Thus, Mathematical Literacy will result in the ability to understand mathematical terminology and to make sense of numerical and spatial information communicated in tables, graphs, diagrams, and texts. Furthermore, Mathematical Literacy will develop the use of basic mathematical skills in critically analysing situations and creatively solving everyday problems.

Music

HOD: J.F. Viljoen

The art of music is one linked intrinsically to the art of being human. Music requires an integrated approach linking several disciplines. This subject is beneficial to students who wish to understand how music functions. It explores not only Western Classical music but also other genres like popular music and jazz. The programme combines performance elements with theoretical and historical components. The main focus of the study is creative output, allowing students to create new art using the tools provided by the course.

Natural Science

HOD: G. Pienaar

Natural Sciences combines Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Earth Sciences and is taken by all senior phase (Grade 8 – 9) students. It provides a grounding in the scientific method and encourages learners to apply critical thinking to all aspects of their lives. There is a strong focus on practical work and solving everyday problems through experimentation.

Physical Science

HOD: G. Makoni

Physical Science is an amazing subject which can bring out unimaginable emotions. The joy of getting it right and the frustrations of not getting it, yet the discipline it produces of working consistently is amazing. The subject opens doors of study in almost any discipline as it requires a creative mindset. The study of it equips pupils to be technically adept and responsible citizens. The subject focuses on Physics and Chemistry topics.

Technology

HOD: M. Tweddle

Technology endeavours to provide pupils with the skills required to succeed in the modern world. At Kingswood the subject focuses mainly on problem solving and computational thinking. Pupils in Grade 8 and 9 are exposed to courses covering a wide range of skills and subjects including website design (html), game design (Scratch) and robotics (Lego).

Visual Art

HOD: P. Jones

So much of how we experience the environments in which we find ourselves, is visual. Art is essentially learning to observe the world around you. It is is also a path of self exploration through the creative process. Technical as well as analytical, conceptual and aesthetic approaches are explored. The theory of art deals with the images that emerged out of different societies and eras and how the masters of the past created various effects to create a mood, message or atmosphere in their works. Art is not only a discipline but also a freedom. The power in art is that it can be whatever you want it to be!

HOD: T. Timm

The study of Accounting is much more than the recording of financial data. The subject focuses on measuring performance and includes analysis, interpretation, evaluation and communication of financial statements and managerial reports for use by interested parties.
The subject also includes the study of business ethics, transparency and accountability as well as auditing, managerial and cost accounting.

Our approach is to link education more closely to the real world. Pupils are expected to learn the skills needed to solve problems, think critically, analyse, access and practically apply financial and managerial knowledge. To do this a case study approach is used. Pupils learn how to identify problem areas within a business and make suggestions on how to rectify the problem.

Why should you study Accounting?

A life skill – regardless of career, everyone needs an understanding of finance. A broad subject with multiple applications.

HOD: T. Ackerman

In a multi-cultural society being able to communicate in an additional language is essential and of great benefit. It especially serves pupils planning to enter a career in education, public service, human resources, business and medicine.

As the late Nelson Mandela said: “If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart.”

We place emphasis  on expanding vocabulary through meaningful pupil-centred activities that involve contemporary teaching methodologies. Pupils will enjoy literary, musical, theatrical and cultural activities.

HOD: J. Wright

The Creative Arts programme is offered to Grade 8 and Grade 9 pupils. The aim of this programme is to provide exposure to all the Arts on offer at Kingswood College, before pupils select core subjects in Grade 10. In Grade 8 our pupils rotate through modules of Art, Drama, Music and Technology. The Technology module is an introduction to coding and creating a foundation in coding. In Art, pupils lay a foundation of different techniques which they then build on in Grade 9. The Drama module focus on the basics of performing, characterization and improvisation as well as stage craft. Students can opt to take subject Music from Grade 8, which looks at both practical and theoretical development. In Grade 9, pupils choose two Arts subjects which they then continue with throughout their Grade 9 year. This allows them to specialize in two of the Arts and keeps their Arts options open for choosing subjects for the Senior phase of high school.

N. Hartzenberg

Business Studies is a broad academic subject in the Social Sciences, taught in Schools from Grade 10 to 12. It allows for the in-depth study of a range of specialty topics such as General Management, Financial Management, Human Resources Management, Marketing, Public Relations, Entrepreneurship, Forms of Ownership, Investment, Insurance, Risk Management, Creative Thinking and Problem Solving, Ethics, Professionalism, Social Responsibility, Corporate Governance, Team and Conflict Management, Business Environmental analysis, Organisational Performance, Research and presentation of data and information.

Application of Business Knowledge, Problem-Solving and Analysis are two areas focused on specifically in the final Grade 12 assessments.

HOD: D. Tipler

Computer Applications Technology broadly involves understanding the concepts of ICTs with regard to the components that make up a computing system, as well as the proficient use of end-user software applications in problem-solving. A successful end-user will, amongst otherthings, be able to use the Internet and World Wide Web to find relevant data. They will then be able to process this data into information, make decisions and communicate their findings in an appropriate manner using appropriate applications. All of which will be done against the backdrop of the responsible use of ICTs from a legal, ethical, environmental and social point of view. (ICTs = Information and Communication Technologies)

D. Tipler

Computer Literacy is a foundation course which seeks to ensure that all Grade 8s are on the same digital page by the end of their first year in the senior school. The content includes becoming familiar with the use of Gmail, Google as a research tool and Classroom for the management of work and the submission thereof. We then move on to some of the Microsoft Office applications. Word processing and spreadsheet skills are developed in order to facilitate the effective use of these programs in support of their other subjects.

HOD: J. Wright

Drama is about action and communication. It is a means of artistic expression. As a subject, Drama not only equips pupils with the necessary skills to pursue a career in performance, but teaches valuable life lessons such as the importance of teamwork and being a reliable member of a group. It is a subject that builds confidence and encourages creative thinking. Drama explores both the practical and theoretical side of performance and theatrical movements. Drama allows for creative play and most importantly independent thinking. Come play!

HOD: T. van Molendorff

Economics is the study of how individuals, businesses, governments and other organisations within our society choose to use scarce resources to satisfy their numerous needs and wants in a manner that is efficient and equitable. This subject equips learners with knowledge and skills that will enable them to participate in a complex economic society.

“…….the master-economist must possess a rare combination of gifts. He must be mathematician, historian, statesman, philosopher–in some degree. He must understand symbols and speak in words. He must contemplate the particular in terms of the general, and touch abstract and concrete in the same flight of thought. He must study the present in the light of the past for the purposes of the future. No part of man’s nature or his institutions must lie entirely outside his regard. He must be purposeful and disinterested in a simultaneous mood; as aloof and incorruptible as an artist, yet sometimes as near the earth as a politician.” John Maynard Keynes

A. Guest

Engineering Graphics and Design is the integration of cognitive and manipulative skills used to design and communicate graphically. It is a combination of lines, symbols and signs used to render services and design processes and systems that contribute towards economic growth and enhanced quality of life.

  • Engineering Graphics and Design will contribute towards learners’ technological literacy by giving them opportunities for:
  • Applying the Design Process to solve Civil, Electrical and Mechanical problems
  • Understanding and using concepts and knowledge; and
    Developing and applying specific skills.

The context of this subject is Civil, Electrical & Mechanical. The implications of this is that the graphics and designs produced and engaged in will have to be reflective of Civil, Electrical & Mechanical. The graphic drawings are done freehand, with instruments and using a CAD program.

HOD: T. Carlson

Learning a language is to understand others and make connections.

The seventeen syllables of this Haiku epitomise not just the hidden agenda of the English Department but also our secret mission and collective modus operandi. As teachers of the only non-choice subject, we are placed in the unique situation of having to, on occasion, justify our position in our pupils’ curriculum. We can cite Wittgenstein and suggest that “the limits of one’s language are in fact the limits of our world”. Hence, it is not always about the Literature we’re studying or how effectively our pupils can deconstruct semantic or grammatical structures; more probably it is about the collaboration and improvisation that goes into their process and ours. Learning these two qualities (if we are to believe the premise set up by Charles Darwin) are what will ensure that these pupils will prevail through “the infinite use of the finite means” that is language.

HOD: S. Ndlovu

French is said to be the language of love, and discovery. Studies have shown that learning a second language makes speakers more linguistically aware of the grammar rules of languages, including their own. 
A French lesson is a cultural journey into the worlds of fashion, gastronomy, the arts, architecture and science. Learning French also offers access to the works of great French writers such as Victor Hugo or Marcel Proust and famous poets like Charles Baudelaire in the original text. It means being able to hear the voices of actors and being able to understand the words of French songs. Our subject, therefore, prepares and equips the students to take on the world linguistically, academically and socially.
The aim is to evoke “un Coup de foudre” when students write, read and speak the French language.

HOD: D. Pyle

“Geography prepares for the world of work – geographers, with their skills of analysis are highly employable. Geography is a living, breathing subject, constantly adapting itself to change. It is dynamic and relevant. For me geography is a great adventure with a purpose.” Michael Palin, 2018.

HOD: W. Koopman

The study of History meets a variety of needs, including the need to understand the world in which we live and the process of change and continuity in human affairs.  History involves a dialogue between the past and the present. It develops the ability to think critically, and assess, evaluate, analyse and solve problem-centred issues.

Where History differs from other disciplines is in the context and range of its material, for it involves the comprehension and analysis of evidence about all people and their activities throughout the ages.  The evidence which is studied is inevitably varied and may be conflicting in itself.  Consequently the pupil learns how to question and assess what is reported of any human event and thus to distinguish between evidence and interpretation.

HOD: M. Tweddle

Information Technology (IT) is the study of how computers work, how they communicate and how to use them to solve problems. A candidate will learn to utilise the information they learn about computers to solve problems, using logical and computational thinking, and developing fully featured programs using the Java language.

HOD: S. Beyi

IsiXhosa language gives pupils an opportunity to be bilingual / multilingual. Frank Smith sums it up by saying, “One language sets you in a corridor for life.Two languages open every door along the way.”

Learning another language is not only learning different words for the same things, but learning another way to think about things.
It also promotes intercultural relations. In IsiXhosa Department we cannot stress enough the importance of the culture of reading IsiXhosa literature as it promotes knowledge and improves vocabulary that will boost pupils’ confidence.

Communication breaks down barriers and builds respect for each other.
Being able to communicate in an additional language opens doors and thus invests in your future.

HOD: J. Stewart

R. Ambedkar says “Unlike a drop of water which loses its identity when it joins the ocean, man does not lose his being in the society in which he lives. Man’s life is independent. He is born not for the development of the society alone, but for the development of his self.”

Life Orientation is about Educating for Life. We want learners to have the social, personal, intellectual, emotional and physical skills needed to reach their full potential for living a meaningful life. We look at helping individuals develop their identity in a rapidly changing society so that they can deal with whatever eventuality they experience.

HOD: C. de Coning

Life Sciences is a dynamic subject that incorporates a diverse range of subject matter.

The study of the diversity of living organisms, their interrelationships and interdependence, provides pupils with an understanding of the living world and how it functions. Human biology and relevant health issues are also given focus.

It allows for the development of a wide range of skills, including critical thinking and practical skills in a manner that is applicable to all aspects of life.

It equips pupils to make socially responsible and informed decisions on health and environmental issues. These are invaluable skills regardless of what field they find themselves pursuing.

HOD: L. Potgieter

Mathematics is a language that makes use of symbols and notations for describing numerical, geometric and graphical relationships.

It is an activity that involves observing, representing and investigating patterns and qualitative relationships in physical and social phenomena and between mathematical objects themselves. It helps to develop mental processes that enhance logical and critical thinking, accuracy and problem solving that will contribute in decision-making. Mathematical problem solving enables us to understand the world (physical, social and economic) around us, and, most of all, to teach us to think creatively.

HOD: L. McLean

Mathematical Literacy provides pupils with an awareness and understanding of the role that mathematics plays in the modern world. Mathematical Literacy is a subject driven by life-related applications of mathematics. It enables pupils to develop the ability and confidence to think numerically and spatially in order to interpret and critically analyse everyday situations and to solve problems. Thus, Mathematical Literacy will result in the ability to understand mathematical terminology and to make sense of numerical and spatial information communicated in tables, graphs, diagrams, and texts. Furthermore, Mathematical Literacy will develop the use of basic mathematical skills in critically analysing situations and creatively solving everyday problems.

HOD: J.F. Viljoen

The art of music is one linked intrinsically to the art of being human. Music requires an integrated approach linking several disciplines. This subject is beneficial to students who wish to understand how music functions. It explores not only Western Classical music but also other genres like popular music and jazz. The programme combines performance elements with theoretical and historical components. The main focus of the study is creative output, allowing students to create new art using the tools provided by the course.

HOD: G. Pienaar

Natural Sciences combines Biology, Physics, Chemistry and Earth Sciences and is taken by all senior phase (Grade 8 – 9) students. It provides a grounding in the scientific method and encourages learners to apply critical thinking to all aspects of their lives. There is a strong focus on practical work and solving everyday problems through experimentation.

HOD: G. Makoni

Physical Science is an amazing subject which can bring out unimaginable emotions. The joy of getting it right and the frustrations of not getting it, yet the discipline it produces of working consistently is amazing. The subject opens doors of study in almost any discipline as it requires a creative mindset. The study of it equips pupils to be technically adept and responsible citizens. The subject focuses on Physics and Chemistry topics.

HOD: M. Tweddle

Technology endeavours to provide pupils with the skills required to succeed in the modern world. At Kingswood the subject focuses mainly on problem solving and computational thinking. Pupils in Grade 8 and 9 are exposed to courses covering a wide range of skills and subjects including website design (html), game design (Scratch) and robotics (Lego).

HOD: P. Jones

So much of how we experience the environments in which we find ourselves, is visual. Art is essentially learning to observe the world around you. It is is also a path of self exploration through the creative process. Technical as well as analytical, conceptual and aesthetic approaches are explored. The theory of art deals with the images that emerged out of different societies and eras and how the masters of the past created various effects to create a mood, message or atmosphere in their works. Art is not only a discipline but also a freedom. The power in art is that it can be whatever you want it to be!